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Voters come out early, and remind others to do the same

Early voter turn-out numbers for November Special Election

The deadline to turn in your ballot is quickly approaching.

Voters have until 8 p.m. Tuesday night to submit their votes, and early Tuesday morning, voters in cars, on foot and while riding bikes, stopped by the ballot boxes in southeast Portland.

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"I want to have some say in what happens to us," Linda Barber, a voter, said.

"It's part of being a citizen,” Jimmy Woodard, another voter, said.

On the Multnomah County ballot there are only three measures:

  1. The Alto Park Water District tax, which will primarily go towards the Lake Oswego Fire District. This tax will cost people in the area $0.40 per $1,000 of assessed property value. On property worth $350,000, it comes out to $210/year.
  2. The Hillsboro School District bond, which is worth $408 million and will go towards improve schools and classrooms and addressing safety, repairs and overcrowding. This bond will cost people in the area $2.24 per $1,000 of assessed property value. On property worth $350,000, it comes out to $784/year.
  3. The Portland Community College bond, which is worth $185 million and will go towards multiple projects including a child care center on the Rock Creek Campus, renovations and modernizing the Portland Metropolitan Workforce Training Center. This bond will cost people in the area $0.40 per $1,000 of assessed property value. On property worth $200,000, it comes out to about $80/year.

Both the Hillsboro and Portland Community College bonds are kind of like a replacement, meaning bonds in those areas are expiring, so this new bond will essentially keep the same rate that taxpayers are already paying in place.

For some voters, it’s the schools they’re passionate about supporting.

"Schools, definitely,” Jillian sorensen, a voter, said. “I feel like schools in our community are highly underserved."

"I’m a big supporter of PCC,” Keith Skille, another voter, said.

Others voters said they turned in their ballot because they’re passionate about the ability to make their voice heard, even if there’s nothing on the ballot particularly motivating to them.

"Not this time," Linda barber, a voter, said, when asked if anything on the ballot stood out to her. "I've never missed a time since I was 18, and I am 76."

Because it's an off-year, some are concerned about the turnout, worried less so about the number of "no" votes and more so about the thousands of "no-shows."

"I just told my friends to vote," Traci Kiyama, a voter, said.

So with just hours to go, they’re taking the time to remind people what suffrage means.

"It's my privilege for living here," Woodward said.

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