Portland chef touts nutrients, healing and stress-relieving properties of bone broth

Chef Tressa Yellig, owner of Broth Bar by Salt, Fire and Time in Portland and also in Olympia, Wash. is committed to sharing the benefits. (KATU)

The healthful appeal of bone broth continues to resonate in Portland and across the country.

This is not the broth your mother fed you when you were sick.

Chef Tressa Yellig, owner of Broth Bar by Salt, Fire and Time in Portland and also in Olympia, Wash. is committed to sharing the benefits.

“Bone broth is basically the easiest way to eat, digest and absorb protein,” Yellig said while preparing a broth for a customer. “It's also great for muscle recovery, improving mobility in our joints, improving or soothing a sour tummy and also it's very soothing for the nervous system.”

The broth bar offers seven different varieties of broth -- from beef, pork, chicken and turkey to bison and -- yes -- even alpaca.

“We cook it for three days under a boil,” she said. “And what that means is we're cooking a very large volume of bones. Bones that are coming from farms that are raising and finishing their animals on pasture and only feeding those animals things they were intended to digest.”

Those different varieties of broth can then be dressed up with spices, noodles, scallions, eggs and antioxidants.

“We can just let it take as long as it needs to get the result we want,” Yellig said, “which is all of those nutrients into solution in a very dense concentration.”

Yellig's Portland broth bar is on Northeast Sixth Avenue between Couch and Davis streets and features everything needed (other than bones) to get customers to make their own at home.

“If you just want to hide the flavor a little bit, or dress it up, or make it more, we’ve got a variety of beautifully harvested sea-salts, all versions of fats so you can add more antioxidants to it, different kinds of anti-inflammatories, basil, fresh turmeric, ginger juice, miso, all kinds of things,” she said.

Yellig says broth is the “foundation” for healing, or at least reducing stress.

“Most people -- due to stress, life, all kinds of things -- are not getting out of their food as much out of their food as they think,” she said. “It doesn’t matter how much you’re spending on organic, local beautiful foods. If you’re not able to digest those foods, it’s kind of a waste of your money."

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