Spring forward - and stay put: Should Oregon abolish daylight saving time?

You know the drill: Spring forward. Fall back. Since 1918, most of the United States has made the twice annual switch from standard time to daylight saving time. (SBG)

EUGENE, Ore. - Spring forward. Fall back.

Spring forward. Fall back.

Spring forward - and stay put.

Under legislation introduced in the Oregon state House and Senate, the Beaver State would spring forward for a final time in 2021 - and never fall back.

The legislation - Senate Bill 320 and House Bill 2297 - calls for the question to be put to voters at a general election.

The proposal to cease moving back and forth and to stay on daylight saving time would take effect November 7, 2021, if approved as submitted by lawmakers and then voters.

The bills have bi-partisan sponsors.

The House bill was introduced by Rep. John Lively, a Democrat from Springfield; and Rep. Bill Post, a Kezier Republican.

Rep. Julie Fahey, a Democrat who represents West Eugene and Junction City; and Rep. Mike Nearman, a Republican from Independence, are also listed as sponsors.

Nearman, Post and Lively are also listed as sponsors on the Senate version, introduced by Sen. Kim Thatcher, a Keizer Republican.

The House bill has been referred to the House Committee on Rules.

The Senate bill has been referred to the Senate Committee On Business and General Government.

No meetings or hearings have been scheduled for either bill as of January 31.

Since 1918, most of the United States has made the twice annual switch from standard time to daylight saving time.

David Wagner, Associate Professor of Management at the University of Oregon, studies the impact of the time change on society as a whole.

"And what we found is that people have a difficult time adjusting to the time change, such that on average Americans get about 40 minutes less of sleep," he said. "The problem is even though the clocks have changed, our internal body clocks have a difficult time changing."

And that has an impact on people - and the economy.

"Some economists have estimated the costs to the American economy at over $430 million per year," Wagner said.

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