STORM TRACKER WEATHER ALERT: Snow blankets Portland's east side, SW Wash.

Multnomah County Sheriff's deputies close NE 238th between Glisan and Halsey - MCSO photo.

PORTLAND, Ore. – Several inches of snow fell across parts of Northwest Oregon and Southwest Washington on Saturday morning, creating slick road conditions and causing several crashes.

Most of the snow fell on the east side of the Portland metro area and across Southwest Washington. Forecasters say it took a while for the cold Arctic air to move in and turn the precipitation into snow, which started to accumulate overnight.

The west side and southern communities, however, only saw a trace (if any) of the anticipated snow.

SEND US YOUR SNOW PHOTOS | LATEST FORECAST

Transportation officials are asking people to stay off the roadways if they don't need to drive, and if they do - to please take their time.

TriMet spokesperson Roberta Altstadt said MAX trains are running regularly and all the buses are on snow routes.

CRASH REPORTS | CLOSURES

Beaverton Police said they are handling several crashes near the Highway 217 and Highway 26 interchange.

Transportation officials closed down the I-205 northbound off-ramp to Airport Way, which is causing lengthy backups on the interstate.

A tanker truck slid into an SUV on the I-5 southbound off-ramp to I-84 east, creating some backups in the area.

Several other ramps along I-84 were closed because of stalled vehicles.

Portland Bureau of Transportation is requiring chains or traction tires on West Burnside and Sam Jackson Road.

The Portland International Airport was reporting 7 cancelled flights and 7 delayed flights at about 11 a.m. | FLIGHT TRACKER

The cold Arctic air is expected to keep pouring into the region, creating winter weather conditions through the weekend.

Some locations at sea level, like Milwaukie and Gladstone, have not yet seen any snow, said KATU Meteorologist Rhonda Shelby.

A Winter Storm Warning has been issued and the metro area can expect 2” to 4” of snow by late Saturday morning. Much higher amounts can be expected in the Cascades and Coast Range.

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